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German Sushi

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How to enjoy your beer

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Cambodian Rat Meat

A growing export market

Rice field rats are considered a delicacy in Cambodia

A unique harvest is under way in the rice fields of Cambodia where tens of thousands of wild rats are being trapped alive each day to feed a growing export market for the meat of rural rodents.

Popularly considered a disease-carrying nuisance in many societies, the rice field rats, Rattus argentiventer, of this small South-East Asian nation are considered a healthy delicacy due to their free-range lifestyle and largely organic diet.

Rat-catching season reaches its height after the rice harvest in June and July when rats have little to eat in this part of rural Kompong Cham province, some 60km from the capital Phnom Penh.

That lack of food coincides with seasonal rains that force the rodents onto higher ground, and into the 120 rat traps local farmer Chhoeun Chhim, 37, said he set each evening.

“Wild rats are very different. They eat different food,” said Mr Chhim, explaining with a gourmand’s intensity the difference between rice-field rats and their urban cousins, which he considers vermin unfit for the cooking pot.

Common rats “are dirty and they have a lot of scabies on their skin,” Mr Chhim said. “That’s why we don’t catch them.”

Somewhat proudly he listed off the superior eating habits of the rats he had caught the night before: rice stalks, the vegetable crops of unlucky local farmers, and the roots of wild plants.

‘Tastes like pork’

On a good night, he can catch up to 25kg of rats.

“After the harvest season the rats don’t have much food to eat, so it is a good time to catch them,” he said, unloading his motorcycle of several large, steel cages filled with rats at the home of the local rat trader.

Though rat meat tastes “a bit like pork,” Mr Chhim said it was not really his preferred meal.

“We sell the rats for money and buy fish instead,” said Chin Chon, 36, another rat catcher as he dropped off several more packed cages to be weighed, graded and repacked for export.

Source: BBCNews Read and see more


Sunday Art Fare

Vineyard for Two - Sung Kim

Vineyard for Two – Sung Kim

Source: CulinaryPosters


Satireday on Fizz

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200-year old bottle of booze found in shipwreck near coast of Poland

Originally posted on Lords of the Drinks:

The oldest drinkable mix drink in the world.

The oldest drinkable mix drink in the world.

Archaeologists have made a stunning discovery in a shipwreck near the coast of Poland; a 200-year old bottle of booze. But wait, it gets better. After running some tests they claim that the content of the stoneware bottle is still drinkable. It’s also the oldest mix drink on the planet, since we are dealing with a mix between hard liquor (vodka or jenever) and water. Maybe not the best cocktail recipe you ever heard of, but with an alcohol percentage of 14 this one liter bottle might still give you a nice buzz.

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I like this label

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Take care

Wines are getting stronger

Warming climate and changed growing techniques are combining to raise the alcohol level in wines

wineslink

Photograph: Katherine Rose for Observer Food Monthly

Two wines made in the same region, from the same grape variety, in the same vintage, at the same price. The only difference, as far as you can tell from the label, is the alcohol. One is 13.5%, the other 14.5%. Which do you choose? If, like me, you’ve learned that a single percentage point can make the difference between a bright new morning after and a sluggish one, you’re going to go for the lower alcohol option.

In the wine world a wine’s alcohol by volume (ABV) is more than a shorthand guide to how it will make you feel: it’s become a touchstone for a fractious debate about how it should taste. Lurking in the background of the dispute is the creeping rise in wine’s alcohol level: a 2% average global increase in the last two decades. The reason is that there is more sugar in the world’s wine grapes when they’re harvested – sugar which is then converted into alcohol during fermentation. The controversy surrounds how that sugar got there, and whether the effects it creates in finished wines are desirable.

Global warming has played its part: the warmer the climate – or vintage – the more sugar there will be in the grape. But wines have been made in hot regions for years, and yet you never used to find bottles with ABVs of 16% or 17% as sometimes come out of California and Australia. Similarly, there have always been warm vintages in temperate regions such as Bordeaux, but alcohol levels rarely broached 13%.

What has changed is the way grapes, particularly red grapes, are grown, and it’s here the controversy begins. At its heart is the concept of phenolic ripeness: the moment when the pips and stalks lose any trace of green. Over the last two decades winemakers became obsessed with techniques such as cutting back yields early in the year to concentrate on fewer bunches or waiting as long as possible to harvest. But the longer you wait for phenolic ripeness, the higher the sugar climbs, and the more acidity you lose. And so, the smooth tannins, and lack of green flavours tend to come with a side order of high alcohol, frequently at the expense of freshness and, some would argue, complexity.

The backlash against high alcohol wines has a militant, ideological edge. Many winemakers tell me they’ve drawn an imaginary line over which no wine should cross. Get much above 14%, they say, and a wine can never be truly fine. Some put the level even lower: I know of several independent retailers and sommeliers that avoid anything over 13.5%.

I can’t say I’m disappointed at this turn back towards elegance. But the move brings problems of its own. I wouldn’t go as far as Robert Parker, the powerful American critic famed for his enthusiasm for big reds, who dismisses the rush to lower alcohol styles as “essentially a phony, anti-California, anti-New World movement by Eurocentric self-proclaimed purists”. But I do think he has the ghost of a point.

Like Parker, I’m concerned that the obsession with an arbitrary acceptable alcohol level rules out some of the great warm climate wines, from Barolo to the Douro, from Roussillon to Napa, all of which tend to be around 14% or higher. The best producers in these regions don’t try to push ripeness to its outer limits. And tasting them you realise that what matters isn’t the number on the label, but a concept as elusive and subjective in wine as it is in life: balance.

Sourece: TheGuardian Read more


Sunday Art Fare

Something different today.

I am fascinated by fried eggs, here’s a collection:

Image: http://trendland.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/11/tjalf-sparnaay-hyperrealistic-food-paintings-5.jpg

Image: tjalf-sparnaay

tjalf-sparnaay

 

Image: Vic Vicini

Image: Vic Vicini

Vic Vicini

Image tjal

Image: tjalf sparnaay

tjalf sparnaay

 

Image:

Image: Kristine Kainer

Kristine Kainer

 

Image: Pinterest

Image: Pinterest

Pinterest

 

Image: F

Image: Fred Bromfield

Fred Bromfield

 

Image: Ylli Haruni

Image: Ylli Haruni

Ylli Haruni

 

 


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