You are what you eat & drink

The Bitter End

Why do some people prefer bitter drinks?

There’s been a wave of popularity for drinks like the Aperol spritz, the Negroni, and a host of cocktails flavoured with “bitters”. Why are people turning their backs on sweet cocktails in favour of a bitter taste?

The last two decades have seen an extraordinary resurgence in cocktail-making on both sides of the Atlantic, with everything from Cointreau-sweetened Cosmopolitans to sugary Mojitos being drunk in vast quantities.

But there is now a definite trend towards bitter drinks. People are ordering whisky or gin-based drinks paired with vermouths. And there is growing interest in the US, UK and other European nations in Italian amari.

These complex, herbal, bittersweet drinks, with names like Averna, Ramazzotti, Montenegro and Fernet Branca, are usually consumed as aperitivi or digestivi – drinks thought to either encourage the appetite before dinner or help with digestion afterwards.

Bitter tasting cocktails are having a renaissance

Their bitter mixer cousins, Cynar, Campari and Aperol, are increasingly being used in cocktails.

Aperol – based on bitter orange and rhubarb and containing classic bitter ingredients like gentian and cinchona (a source of quinine) – has rocketed in popularity in recent years following a push by owner Gruppo Campari.

Sales rose 156% in the UK in 2012 and 56% in the US. This year’s figures, announced soon, are expected to be even bigger. A poster campaign in the UK encourages people to try an Aperol spritz – prosecco sparkling wine and soda water mixed with Aperol.

A fundamental point of the spritz is its low alcohol content. Aperol’s slogan is “poco alcolico”, roughly meaning a little bit alcoholic.

“I think the Aperol spritz was probably the most asked-for drink in the outdoor areas of most decent bars in London this summer,” says World Duty Free mixologist Charlie McCarthy.

Laura Tallo, from Nonna’s Italian Cucina in Bath, says many British drinkers have returned after holidays in Italy, having seen certain drinks paired with tavola calda – the selection of hot, freshly-baked food.

“People are definitely beginning to embrace the Italian custom of drinking aperitifs. We have seen a definite trend emerging of people choosing classic Italian pre-dinner drinks such as an Aperol spritz, Negroni [equal parts Campari, gin and sweet vermouth], Americano or Martini,” she says.

Such drinks are not to everyone’s taste, of course. While many Italians have been brought up around the tradition of amari, they can baffle non-Italian palates at first taste.

“They say of a Negroni the first two or three sips you despise, and after you have had two or three drinks you start to like it,” says Tom Ross, bars manager of the Polpo restaurant group in London.

The taste of Fernet Branca – vaguely minty but with pungent undertones of cough medicine – is so powerful that comedian Bill Cosby constructed a seven-minute anecdote around his initial horror on encountering the drink in Italy. And yet Fernet is loved by many, being drunk with cola in Argentina and – accompanied by a separate shot of ginger beer – known as the “bartender’s handshake” in San Francisco.

One of the first recorded definitions of a cocktail was in a New York journal in 1803, which classified it as a mixture of any “spirituous liquor”, with water, sugar and “bitters”, known at the time as a bittered sling.

You can find the descendant of these traditional bitters (with the term typically referring to both singular and plural) in any decent bar in the UK or US. There’ll be a rather unusual bottle among the others – small with a yellow top and an oversized label covered in small print. It is the world’s most famous cocktail bitters, Angostura.

This bitters is the key ingredient in pink gin, the traditional officers’ cocktail in the Royal Navy. It’s also the bedrock of famous cocktails, including the Old Fashioned, beloved of Mad Men’s Don Draper, and the Manhattan. A supply shortage in 2009 caused panic throughout the world’s bartending community, according to McCarthy, and prompted bartenders to start making their own.

The current wave of speakeasy-type bars inspired by the prohibition years in the US, has prompted interest in traditional and hitherto forgotten cocktails. This in turn has prompted demand for more unusual bitters.

Bob Petrie, of Bob’s Bitters, started in 2005 when he was approached by the Dorchester Hotel to create a range.

Traditional bitters are very complex, with aromatic flavours brought out from a combination of barks, roots, herbs, and spices by macerating them in alcohol. He looked at pairing them with the “botanicals” in gin, and came up with a range including cardamom, chocolate, coriander, ginger, grapefruit, lavender, liquorice, orange and mandarin, peppermint and vanilla.

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