You are what you eat & drink

Meat

Andouille de Guemene

The French delicacy made of 25 layers of pig intestines

Guemene-sur-Scorff in north-west France may not be well known internationally, but a popular French delicacy was born in the town. The andouille de Guemene is a pork sausage made from pigs’ intestines and stomachs.

A local andouillerie, Rivalan Quidu, advertises its presence on the outskirts of Guemene-sur-Scorff in Brittany, France, with a sculpture in the corner of its vast car park.

You won’t need to take a great leap of imagination to visualise what a representation, in fibreglass, of two giant andouilles might be mistaken for, but the locals take their home-grown delicacy very seriously indeed.

A steady stream of customers – from passing tourists to lorry drivers on their regular beat – pull in to buy a chunk.

The andouille de Guemene is a relatively new phenomenon – the recipe having been created only in 1930 by Joseph Quidu, the son of a local farmer – but Gallic gourmands with a fascination for all elements of the gastrointestinal tract of a pig have embraced it as a classic.

As I push open the shop door I’m enveloped by the aromas of fat and smoke. I suspect just breathing the air could send my cholesterol levels into double figures.

The narrow shop is fitted out to resemble a Breton kitchen, complete with pine fixtures. Andouilles hang from every part of the ceiling like crinkly brown stalactites. At one end is a typically huge Breton fireplace – it too is festooned with andouilles, being smoked over a wood fire.

The stones are caked in glistening, sooty fat. Behind the counter is Benoit, husband of Joseph’s grand-daughter Francoise, who together with their children are carrying the tradition of the andouille de Guemene into its third and fourth generations.

Out at the back, away from the public gaze – and possibly out of respect for the squeamish – is the kitchen where the andouilles are created in a modern style true to Joseph’s original recipe.

Inspired, I like to imagine, by the act of pulling on more than one pair of socks to counter the cold and damp Breton winters, Joseph pulled one length of chaudin – or pig intestine – over another, and then another. Around 20 or 25 in all.

The salted intestines of three pigs, weighing in at 3kg, go into each andouille, which are then smoked over oak wood and dried, sometimes for months on end before being cooked slowly in stock. Cut through, the innards resemble pinky-grey tree rings carrying a distinctly smoky taste and aroma.

Source: BBCNews Read and see more


Bacontry

Bacon chips

 

bacontrees

 

BaconDuctTape

 

bacon

 

baconator

 

baconsalad

 

Converts-Vegetables-To-Bacon-Funny-Pig-Humor

 

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Who, what, why:

What happens if you eat 112-year-old ham?

A ham in the US said to be the oldest in the world has celebrated its 112th birthday. Can it really be edible after all this time, asks Tom de Castella.

It was first cured by the Gwaltney meat company in 1902, forgotten about at the back of a storage room, and eventually donated to the Isle of Wight County Museum in Smithfield, Virginia. Today it looks like a piece of old leather. A special case protects it from bugs and mould, and it is billed the world’s oldest edible cured ham. “It would be dry, dry tasting, but it’s not molded,” curator Tracey Neikirk told the Wall Street Journal.

Dry curing – salting the meat and draining the blood – allows ham to last and develop a richer flavour. But most hams are only aged for a year or two. Not 112. “After such a long time and without knowing how the ham was processed it’s difficult to know whether it would be safe,” a Food Standards Agency spokesman says. To most people “edible” means more than the ability to eat something without it killing you. “Jamon iberico of four to five years is amazing,” says Jose Pizarro, owner of Pizarro, a Spanish restaurant in London.” The oldest edible ham he’s heard of is eight years old. After that the fat starts to oxidise and the flavour disappears from the meat. A rancid taste develops as the yellow fat diffuses, and as the decades pass it will become as hard as a stone and incredibly ugly, he says.

And then there’s the question of whether the Virginia museum’s really is the oldest. In 1993, Michael Feller, a butcher in Oxford, bought a ham at auction that was 101 years old. It looked “rather yukky” but was edible, although he wasn’t going to cut into it. Today it hangs in the shop window, unnibbled at the ripe old age of 122. Food writer Jay Rayner is unmoved by the battle for the title of oldest ham. “I’d be suspicious of anyone getting excited about the former back end of a pig that’s been hanging around for 112 years.” Wine and spirits offer a better bet. He remembers drinking a “rather lovely” 1865 armagnac. It had aged well – “deep and toasty” – but the real attraction was not its flavour, he concedes. It was “that link with antiquity”. Which perhaps explains the birthday party for a shrivelled up piece of pork.

Source: BBCNews


Bone up on Beef

Reblog from: richardmax22

My Meat Department Tabloid

I was raised in the meat business. My father had a slaughter-house and meat cutting and packing plant that I worked for several years when not in school. After being discharged from the military I worked in the logging industry for 18 years. When that company shut down and we were all laid off, I decided to get back into meat cutting and purchased a meat market which I owned for 14 years. I also worked a couple of years cutting meat in a Piggly Wiggly store. Bottom line, I do know something about cuts of meat, and will share a few facts one might find interesting.

1. What makes some beef tender or tough?

Okay, do you want to know? Click on the link above.

beef_cuts

 


Image

Satireday on Fizz

thesteaks


Ham Freak

Reblogged from: Think, Read, Cook

In Honour of My Father: After the Ham

AfterTheHam

My dad was a ham freak.

Like his father before him, he would eat ham in pretty much any form. Baked ham, fried ham, ham sandwiches, ham omelettes, ham croquettes. And like him, I’m completely ham-addicted myself.

Dad baked a great ham.

Read more, inc a recipe for ham spread.


Perfect Steak


Image

How do you like your steak?

steaks


Venison

A "no horsemeat" sign at Bates Butchers in Market Harborough, central EnglandWith the recent horsemeat scandal advancing over the European continent, I thought it a reasonable opportunity to look at another alternative.

Venison was originally the meat from any game animal, i.e. one that was hunted or trapped. But today it refers almost exclusively to the meat of the deer.

Check out the fat in these steaks… next to none – image: Wikipedia

Venison may be eaten as steaks, tournedos, roasts, sausages, jerky and minced meat. It has a flavor reminiscent of beef, but is richer and can have a gamey note. Venison tends to have a finer texture and is leaner than comparable cuts of beef. However, like beef, leaner cuts can be tougher as well.

Organ meats of deer are eaten, but would not be called venison. Rather, they are called noumbles. This is supposedly the origins of the phrase “humble pie”, literally a pie made from the organs of the deer.

Venison is higher in moisture, similar in protein and lower in calories, cholesterol and fat than most cuts of grain-fed beef, pork, or lamb.

Venison has enjoyed a rise in popularity in recent years, owing to the meat’s lower fat content. It can often be obtained at less cost than beef by hunting. Wikipedia

Here’s a sample:

Venison chops and mushrooms - image Neighborhood Wine & Porch Party Blog

Venison chops and mushrooms – image Neighborhood Wine & Porch Party Blog

You want some wine pairings as well, then check that blog out.


Satireday on Fizz

United Steaks of America

United Steaks of America

Image courtesy of http://www.hahastop.com/pictures/United_Steaks_Of_America.htm.


Stuff your sausages!

Cheap & Low-Tech Way to Stuff Sausage:

With a Chinese Soup Spoon!

If you’ve ever been interested in making your own sausage, but put off by the equipment needed to do it, Bon Appetit has a smart method that uses just one low-tech tool: a Chinese soup spoon.

I can’t get the video, but check it out on the links below or, visit Life is a Labytrinth

In the video above, Chef Kris Yenbamroong demonstrates how to stuff sausages with a spoon, using the narrow end to gather the casing and the wide end as a sort of funnel to more easily stuff in the sausage mixture. It will probably take a few tries to become as adept at the process as Yenbamroong, but if you’re looking for a budget-friendly way to take up a new DIY project, it’s worth a try.

And whether you’re stuffing it into casings or simply shaping it into free-form patties, the included recipe for spicy, savory, sweet and sour Thai sausage mixture sounds like a keeper.

Get the recipe: Sai Uah (Thai Sausages) at Bon Appetit

Reposted from: theKitchn


The Write White

It is written, almost indelibly, “red meat – red wine; white meat – white wine”, but is this necessarily true?

Are you having a turkey Christmas dinner?

Turkey has replaced the traditional goose on British festive tables

Turkey has replaced the traditional goose on British festive tables

If so, what are you going to drink with it?

What wine with turkey?

It’s a question that comes up at Christmas. But if you think about it, the answer can be as simple as – what do you like?

For that Christmas turkey, there’s a good match for every taste – whether you or your family and guests prefer white, red, or rosé …

  • If you and your guests prefer dry white wines, dry and oakey Chardonnay is the favorite choice with turkey depending on the particular tastes of your family and guests. Sauvignon Blanc or a White Burgundy are also good all-around choices that pair well with everything from mashed turnips to turkey stuffing.
  • If your guests prefer their wines on the sweet side, White Zinfandel is the all-purpose favorite to go with most of your turkey feast.
  • Or, head for the German wine aisle at your favorite wine shop to pick out a light but slightly spicy Gewurztraminer that’s always a good match for the holiday bird. A slightly sweeter Riesling will also pair well with any dish at a Thanksgiving or holiday table. If the label says ‘Kabinett’, the wine is made from the earliest harvest. That means the Riesling will be a dryer wine. A Spätlese is a bit sweeter, but still retains the dryness of the wine — and is usually a favorite in American homes. An Auslese will be even sweeter and makes a better match for the dessert than the turkey.
  • If red wines are normally your favorite, Pinot Noir is the perfect red wine for holiday feasting. More robust than white wine, Pinot Noir has very little tannin and will likely blend well with the entire holiday meal. Serve it slightly chilled.

 Text modified from: chiff.com

Chablis?

Chardonnay

Sancerre Chavignol?

Riesling?

Furmint?

Pinot Gris?

So many to choose from…


Sunday Art Fare

William Pettit’s Meat Paintings

 

Source: Eat Me Daily Check for more of William Pettit’s meat paintings


Faggots

Now, I know what you’re thinking…

You’re not allowed to cook faggots, it’s sexual discrimination.

The days of burning witches, heretics and politicians at the stake are gone, although it’s a pity about the politicians…

Caul Fat, the exterior stomach lining of the pig

Faggots are like meatballs made from meat off-cuts and offal, especially pork. A faggot is traditionally made from pig’s heart, liver and fatty belly meat or bacon minced together, with herbs added for flavouring and sometimes bread crumbs. The meat is shaped in the hand into balls, wrapped with caul fat , and baked.

Traditional fare from Wales and the English Midlands.

Faggots can be made from a variety of meats.

Faggots. Offally good, if you like that sort of thing… picture from PracticallyDaily. Source: Brownhill’s Blog

Not limited to pork and venison (above), but also black pudding…

BLACK PUDDING FAGGOTS AND STOUT GRAVY

A traditional faggot is wrapped in caul fat to hold it together. Increasingly difficult to get hold of, this thin membrane of fat is replaced here by an outer casing of bacon.

Black pudding faggots and chips for lunch, image source: The Telegraph

pork belly 125g
an onion
lamb’s liver 250g
black pudding 100g
garlic cloves 2
white pepper
fresh white breadcrumbs 50g
streaky bacon 12 rashers
cocktail sticks
stout, or other dark beer 500ml

DIRECTIONS

Set the oven at 180C. Peel and chop the onion. Cut the pork belly up a little and drop it into the bowl of a food processor, then blitz with the onion and lamb’s liver till coarsely chopped. Add the black pudding and blitz very briefly, then tip into a large mixing bowl. Crush the garlic and add it to the meat, together with a generous grinding of salt and white pepper. Mix in the breadcrumbs.

Divide the mixture into six equal amounts. Place them on a work surface and roll loosely into balls. Wrap each with two rashers of bacon, overlapping, around the outside of the meat, leaving the top of each open, then secure each with a couple of cocktail sticks. Transfer carefully to a roasting tin or baking dish.

Pour the stout into the roasting tin and bake for 35-40 minutes, till the tops are lightly crusted. Check the seasoning of the liquor in the pan before serving.

Recipe source


Criadillas

Here’s something to make you cringe.

Bulls Balls

No, that’s not a typo.

In Spanish, criadillas, doesn’t sound quite so gutsy, but rolls off the tongue easier than the English.

Can you imagine that they are edible?

Tacos are a good vehicle for the first timer.

Criadillas a la Mexicana

They look okay, you want the recipe and step by step instructions as well as a good write with a bit of a giggle…

Then visit La Cocina de Leslie

“The texture was like biting into a hot dog and the flavor of the Criadillas, sauteed with Salsa Mexicanawas like a spicy sausage.”


I’m Afraid to Ask


Good ol’ Bangers

Sausages are renown the world over. They are probably the most famous form of processed meat, but how much do you really know about sausages?

Try this Guardian quiz and see…