You are what you eat & drink

Posts tagged “Coffee

Sunday Art Fare

Pouring the coffee

Pouring the coffee

Photographic art is still art.

I saw this and loved it.

Source: Pintrest (lost the link, if it’s yours, let me know and I will add it)

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Kahlua Cocktails

kahluaKahlua, awesome liqueur.

Some people drink it straight, some on the rocks, some make a Brown Cow with milk.

But there are many cocktails that you can experiment with.

Mix it with Amaretto and cream.

Try a Mudslide with vodka and Bailey’s Irsih Cream.

Add Cuarenta y Tres .

Add it to coffee for a hot winter drink.

Make a Kahlua Bushwacker with Malibu rum, coconut milk, dark rum and creme de cacau; top up with milk and ice.

Kahlua Root Beer Float, add root beer and vanilla icecream.

A Kahlua Mai Tai made with vodka and fresh lime, pineapple and orange juice.

Want to get fancy? Kahlua Marshmellow Shots. Toast marshmellows, hollow out and add Kahlua.

The Milky Way add Frangelico liqueur, Bourbon and same quantity milk.

White Russian, add fresh cream and ice.

Monte Cristo – Trple Sec, cup of coffee, whipped cream, chocolate shavings and orange zest.

And… don’t forget to celebrate:

Happy National Kahlua Day

on 27th February.

I haven’t added recipes, or links, if you need them, maybe you shouldn’t go near the cicktail cabinet.

 


What beer be this?

 

Black Chocolate Stout

Brooklyn Brewery Black Chocolate Stout

from Brooklyn Breweries.

Read a great review on Blood, Stout & Tears


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And on Coffee…

Coffee-Flavored-Coffee


Coffee, Pinot Noir, or Both?

Single Origin Coffee Aged in a Pinot Noir Barrel? Only in Portland

[Photo: James Holk]

I know, I know. We’re all thinking the same thing. Portland found one more thing they could infuse with booze? This time, a beautiful single origin coffee from El Salvador, aged in an oak Pinot Noir barrel? Sure. But think again: beyond gimmick and Portlandianism, to a subtle, thoughtfully conceived coffee roasted by Southeast Portland roaster Water Avenue Coffee, balanced and still very much a coffee beverage.

Water Avenue partner and roaster Brandon Smyth came to the unusual idea—coffee beers are sometimes aged in oak barrels, but not coffee coffees—through winemaking.

“A long while back, when I was still roasting at Stumptown, I was making my own wine. And you can either go out and buy a barrel, which is pretty expensive, or you can add oak powder to wine. And I was making a red wine and I was tasting it before and after I put the oak in there, and what I expected was the oak to tasty oaky, to taste woody. But it actually brought out a bunch of berry, fruit flavor! So I thought, oh man, that’d be cool to try that with some coffee.”

Smyth originally dropped the oak experiment on some Sumatran coffee beans, post-roasting, and found the final brew fruity and “more burly” but overall a bit extreme. His next move was to try aging green, unroasted coffee beans for a short time in a barrel used for making red wine. But it’s not as easy to find a good used wine barrel as you might think—Smyth says one vintner was “so confused by what I was asking and what I was planning to do with it that he thought I was a crackpot.” But when he finally came into possession of a decommissioned Pinot Noir barrel from Oregon vintners Crowley Wines, he knew he just had to use the right coffee. “I opened it up and it just smelled amazing,” Smyth said. “Like cherries.”

Luckily, Water Avenue already had a coffee called El Manzano from El Salvador in their repertoire—a coffee with whose farm they’ve had an ongoing relationship, and which offers flavors of apple, dark berries, caramel and chocolate, while still maintaining a sunny acidity. It’s also a pulp natural processed coffee, meaning the freshly harvested coffee undergoes its drying period with the fruit’s mucilage still on the bean, which can result in sweeter and fruitier flavor in the cup.

“I thought, it’s a pulp natural, and the fruit flavor it had had a lot of red apple to it,” said Smyth. “There’s a certain crispness to it that I felt if you were going to add anything to it, that clarity of that coffee would only bring it out more. The barrel’s not going to cover anything up that would actually be detrimental to the flavor,” said the roaster.

“To me, those fruits that come out, the cherry from the barrel work really well with the red apple from the Manzano. I also feel like having a little bit of pulp helps the coffee absorb the flavor. Pulp naturals age really well, they have a lot of that pectin on the bean that helps protect them from the environment.”

And the results are vivid: a balanced coffee whose intrinsic apple and cocoa flavors and the delicate oak and cherry additions exist in harmonious parallel. You can separate them out in your brain—but in a way that is more likely to surprise and make you rethink tasting than anything else.

Water Avenue has already gone through 300 pounds of the 13-day-aged coffee beans, and they expect to be able to age another 500 pounds before they think the barrel flavor will begin to fade—then again, Smyth doesn’t really know when that will happen, because he’s never tried this before. What’s next?

“I know a guy down here who’s a cooper making cedar barrels, so we’re going to do a cedar one which might be interesting. I don’t want to get too far into it because, while it’s interesting and it’s fun, I’d like to have one thing going on, or all of the sudden, are we flavoring coffee? Is it just manufacturing it, or a certain kind of gimmick,” mused Smyth. “I don’t want to get too weird.”

About the author: Liz Clayton

Source: Serious Eats

 


WTF is Cold Brewed Coffee?

Rummaging through my google box this morning I discovered cold brewed coffee, which piqued my interest.

Reblogged from Brewed Daily

What is cold brewed coffee?

Cold brewed is a coffee term that has been popping up more and more frequently, even though there are plenty of cafes – including the chain Seattle’s Best – that have been offering up cold brewed coffee for quite some time now.

Cold brewed coffee is just what it sounds like: coffee that is brewed cold, not hot. To make it, ground coffee beans are placed in cool water and left to sit in a cool place for around 12 hours to brew.

Cold brewing produces a milder and sweeter cup of coffee than simply refrigerating coffee that is brewed hot. You don’t get the harsher, more bitter notes of coffee that are often brought out after chilling hot-brewed coffee. Cold brewed coffee will keep very well for several days in the refrigerator after it has been made, and it is easy to make a big batch and keep it on hand.

As with regular coffee, you will want to experiment with the ratio of coffee grounds to water to get a concentration that you like, but err on the side of using too much coffee. Not only are you not rising adding bitterness to your drink by doing this, but you can always water down a cold-brewed coffee concentrate with a bit of extra water before serving if it is too strong.

Comment:

Hmmm, have to try that.


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Seen in a Coffee Shop

nowifitalk


Satireday on Fizz

 

NEVER let a man make the morning coffee!

 

mancoffeemaking


Sunday Art Fare

Londoncoffeehousec1668_2171668b

London coffee-house (1668) for the consumption of coffee, tea and sherbet.

Source: A World Elsewhere


Sunday Art Fare

Still life with Antique coffee grinder, burlap sack, coffee cups and chocolate on  rustic table

Still life with Antique coffee grinder, burlap sack, coffee cups and chocolate on rustic table

Can’t remember where I got this from…

It’s a photo, but it’s still art, I love it.