You are what you eat & drink

Posts tagged “offal foods

Haggis

Bafflingly, for many people Scottish cuisine remains something of an oxymoron, little more than a cholesterol-laden punchline. – The Guardian

I have never eaten haggis, although I have heard a lot about it, and should I ever be close to one, I would try it.

Haggis - Image: diewhiskybotschaft.de

Haggis – Image: diewhiskybotschaft.de

The idea of haggis is intriguing. I like most offal foods, with the exception of tripe, so I see no reason for not liking haggis.

Haggis is a spicy, meatloaf-like minced sheep offal served with ”neeps and tatties,” or turnips and potatoes – the perfect Scottish comfort food. Image: Foodie International

Traditionally,  Haggis is a savoury pudding containing sheep’s pluck (heart, liver and lungs); minced with onion, oatmeal, suet, spices, and salt, mixed with stock, and traditionally encased in the animal’s stomach and simmered for approximately three hours.”Wikipedia

But there are many many things you can do to haggis.

Haggis Sausage Rolls – Image: Dinner Diary (with recipe)

Haggis & Oatcake Canapé – Image: Yahoo Lifestyle and recipe

If you look around the net, you can find haggis balls, deep fried haggis balls, vegetarian haggis, haggis puffs, haggis crepes, haggis toasted sandwiches, haggis and chips.

Then there’s the fast food and international influences… haggis pizza, haggisburger, haggis pakora, haggis nachos, haggis burritos, haggis and onion bhajis… You can stuff chicken with it, you can get it in a can or in sachets.

The list is endless. Haggis has to be amongst the most versatile foods.

And… you can feed the scraps to the cat.

Then there’s haggis for dessert chocolates.

Haggis Chocolates – Image: SodaHead

Scotland-based chocolate maker, Nadia Ellingham, just invented a horrifying new desert: Haggis-flavored Chocolate. It’s chocolate with a hint of sheep’s liver, heart, lungs, oatmeal, onions and spices boiled in the animal’s own stomach. It’s amazing no one thought of this before.

In Ellingham’s defense, she has stated that she avoided including any haggis ingredients that would clash with the taste of the chocolate. But still, when the clashing ingredient in haggis IS haggis, it’s hard to understand what she left in.

There is much humour about the haggis…

haggisFrom:  Improbable Research – How to Raise Haggis

The Haggis – An Endangered Scottish Species

The Wild Haggis

The Haggis Hunting Season

As winter approaches, a crime against Scottish wildlife looms. From 30th November (St. Andrews Day) to 25th January (Robert Burns birthday), a small, defenceless furry creature is chased and killed to provide the Scots with their traditional feast.

Read more on: HubPages

 


That Awful Black Pudding is Making a Come Back

Quite coincidental, but news of black pudding making a come back appeared the day after my first post on Awful Offal Foods.

It seems that black pudding is returning, at least in Britain.

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Black pudding is back on the menu, thanks to austerity and celebrity chefs

TV recipes and hard times bring new boom in sales of traditional sausage described in some quarters as ‘Lancashire viagra’

Black pudding customers near Chadwick's Original Bury Black Puddings stall on Bury market. Photograph: Christopher Thomond for the Guardian

Black pudding may be as integral to British culinary culture as fish and chips, spotted dick and the Sunday roast, but – perhaps due to queasiness over its main ingredient – it has languished at the bottom of the nation’s collective shopping list for years.

But now, through a combination of celebrity chef endorsements and economic austerity the “blood sausage” is enjoying a sales boom. Producers of traditional black puddings, from the Outer Hebrides to the rolling foothills around the Lancashire valleys, say demand for their product has soared by up to 25% over the past year.

Duncan Haigh, owner of Arthur Haigh, near Thirsk in North Yorkshire, which makes the award-winning Doreen’s Black Pudding, had to build an extension to his premises in order to cope with demand.

“Black pudding is not just for breakfast any more,” Haigh said. “A lot of chefs are using it because they realise it brings richness to a dish. It’s now found in starters and main courses.”

Depending on the regional variation, black puddings contain a mix of dried blood, salt and rusk.

Some producers prefer ox or sheep blood to that of pigs while others employ suet and oatmeal in their recipes. But whatever the outcome, traditional black pudding makers keep their exact contents a closely guarded secret.

Chadwick’s Original Bury Black Pudding has been making its distinctive puddings since 1865. The firm’s stall on Bury market, Greater Manchester, is a local tourist attraction.

Source: The Guardian Read more

Black pudding is not new, in fact it can be traced back to the time of Homer – ‘The first known written mention of black pudding was as early as 800 BC when it appeared in Homer’s classic The Odyssey.  In book twenty of his great canon, Homer wrote “As when a man besides a great fire has filled a sausage with fat and blood and turns it this way and that and is very eager to get it quickly roasted…”.’ – Blackpudding.org

Black pudding, or its various forms have been used by nearly every race on Earth at one time or another; from the ancient Romans and Greeks to the Mongols of Genghis Khan. and beyond.

It has featured in royal banquets, been a staple of the poor, it has raised religious argument and featured in literature and television.

You want to know more, then try Wikipedia and the .org link above.