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Retro utensil print

Source: Bespoke Prints

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Satireday on Fizz

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Frackin’ with Our Beer

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Wednesday Whine

Back again after the interruptions of the World Cup.

Concha y Toro Merlot ReservadoToday’s wine, once again, is not in the rack, it’s in the glass as I write. Actually, there is another in the rack.

Concha y Toro

Merlot

Reservado

A Chilean wine from the Central Valley.

It doesn’t stipulate the harvest.

Aroma of ripe red fruit.

Goes well with white meats, pastas, pizzas, risottos and fresh white cheeses.

I am having mine with feijoada, a little bit heavier than the recommended pairings.

But I like the smoothness of Merlot.

Priced to fit my pocket at around R$20.oo.

definitely NOT plonk.

Concha y Toro winery

Concha y Toro winery

 

Who, what, why:

What happens if you eat 112-year-old ham?

A ham in the US said to be the oldest in the world has celebrated its 112th birthday. Can it really be edible after all this time, asks Tom de Castella.

It was first cured by the Gwaltney meat company in 1902, forgotten about at the back of a storage room, and eventually donated to the Isle of Wight County Museum in Smithfield, Virginia. Today it looks like a piece of old leather. A special case protects it from bugs and mould, and it is billed the world’s oldest edible cured ham. “It would be dry, dry tasting, but it’s not molded,” curator Tracey Neikirk told the Wall Street Journal.

Dry curing – salting the meat and draining the blood – allows ham to last and develop a richer flavour. But most hams are only aged for a year or two. Not 112. “After such a long time and without knowing how the ham was processed it’s difficult to know whether it would be safe,” a Food Standards Agency spokesman says. To most people “edible” means more than the ability to eat something without it killing you. “Jamon iberico of four to five years is amazing,” says Jose Pizarro, owner of Pizarro, a Spanish restaurant in London.” The oldest edible ham he’s heard of is eight years old. After that the fat starts to oxidise and the flavour disappears from the meat. A rancid taste develops as the yellow fat diffuses, and as the decades pass it will become as hard as a stone and incredibly ugly, he says.

And then there’s the question of whether the Virginia museum’s really is the oldest. In 1993, Michael Feller, a butcher in Oxford, bought a ham at auction that was 101 years old. It looked “rather yukky” but was edible, although he wasn’t going to cut into it. Today it hangs in the shop window, unnibbled at the ripe old age of 122. Food writer Jay Rayner is unmoved by the battle for the title of oldest ham. “I’d be suspicious of anyone getting excited about the former back end of a pig that’s been hanging around for 112 years.” Wine and spirits offer a better bet. He remembers drinking a “rather lovely” 1865 armagnac. It had aged well – “deep and toasty” – but the real attraction was not its flavour, he concedes. It was “that link with antiquity”. Which perhaps explains the birthday party for a shrivelled up piece of pork.

Source: BBCNews

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Which wine for what food

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Sunday Art Fare

and a bit of humour this week…

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Bottles of Life

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Satireday on Fizz

Foodfunny

Sunday Art Fare

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Country Kitchen

by peka444

Digital art

Source: deviantart

My Favourite Food Patron Saints

argentumvulgaris:

I have never thought about “food saints” before…

Originally posted on Cheese FC:

Saints in Roman times and the Middle Ages had great stories attached to them. Here are some of my favourite food patron saints.

Saint Lawrence was a Deacon of Rome in 258, a time when Christians were not really venerated in the eternal city. He made the mistake of distributing riches to the poor. This attracted the attention of the Roman emperor, who ordered him to hand over those riches to him. Lawrence, who was actively looking for martyrdom, presented some beggars, crippled, orphans etc., to the emperor, saying that these were the greatest treasures of the Church. This pissed off the emperor just a tiny bit, so he decided to kill Lawrence by grilling him above some nice hot charcoal. After being grilled for a while Saint Lawrence was nicely burned, but had one last witty remark in store: “This side is nicely burned, you can now turn me…

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